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How to cook roast lamb

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There is nothing better than the tempting aroma of roasting lamb drifting through your house. It’s a great Sunday lunch staple and this is the perfect time of year to enjoy it. At Meat No Veg we pride ourselves in supplying only the finest cuts and joints of lamb, and we know a thing or two about how to cook it too! The good news is that the perfect roast lamb is really easy to achieve, so here’s our handy guide to cooking delicious roast lamb that’s guaranteed to get your guests’ mouths watering.

How to cook Lamb

You’ll get the best results if you cook the lamb from room temperature, so be sure to take it out of the fridge around half an hour before you plan to roast it. Preheat the oven according to our guide below and season the lamb with salt and pepper. When you’re ready, pop the lamb in to roast, pulling it out two or three times in order to baste it (do this by tipping the pan and using a long-handled spoon to ladle the juices and pour them back over the lamb).

Our cooking temperatures and times chart below is a fantastic guide, but there is no better way to be sure that it’s cooked to perfection than to test the temperature (it should be 55-70 degrees Celsius depending on how well done you like your lamb). Notice the colour of the juices - in rare lamb they will be faintly red, pinker for medium or clear for well done. Remove the lamb from the oven, basting one more time before wrapping it in foil to keep warm.

Serve with buttered new potatoes, roasted seasonal vegetables and of course a generous dollop of mint sauce. No roast dinner is complete without a bottle of wine, and a full-bodied Rioja is the perfect accompaniment to this great British dish.

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​A Little More About James Burden Limited

The Meat No Veg name is already synonymous with quality produce and high-end service, and when you look at our pedigree it’s easy to see why! Meat No Veg is part of the James Burden Limited Group, the renowned wholesale suppliers and traders of meat, poultry, provisions and game. When you find out a little [...]

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